The Life of the Alienated Parent

Parental Alienation

The Life of the Alienated Parent

In today’s changing social landscape, divorce has become a significant and immutable feature. Currently, more marriages end in divorce than do not. The reasons for this are many and complex, and although these reasons are debated, the fact of the predominance of divorce is not disputed. With this upswing in divorce comes also an explosion in the number of children of divorce.

Due primarily to social and legal changes that occurred in the 1970’s, the dilemma of where and with whom the child would live primarily became a reality that more of us knew directly or indirectly. Simply put, child custody disputes have become a much more prominent feature of our everyday lives. Children are routinely fought over in custody disputes, and seldom does a day pass that one does not hear of some tragic and sometime violent event that occurred in the context of a custody dispute. Related to this, the courts have become choked with allegations of one spouse abusing the other spouse and/ or the children, again in the context of one of these custody disputes. It is within this complex social and legal issue that the terms Parental Alienation and Parental Alienation Syndrome were born.

Parental Alienation

This website is devoted to addressing this phenomenon of Parental Alienation and its legacy Parental Alienation Syndrome, also known as PAS. The purpose of this website is for the education of parents, mental health professionals, attorneys and judges, who find themselves dealing with these terribly difficult issues.

The sponsor of this website is Brian Ludmer in private practice in Canada. His practice is primarily devoted to dealing with all aspects of Parental Alienation Syndrome that is its evaluation and diagnosis as well as its treatment. He worked extensively with the late Richard Gardner, M.D., who first described the syndrome in 1985. He, along with Dr. Gardner and others in the field, served on the Scientific and Professional Advisory Board of the Parental Alienation Research Foundation in Washington D.C. until its demise in 2000. He has continued working in this field and routinely travels all over the United States, serving as evaluator, therapist and educator regarding PAS.